Trip TO Azerbaijan – Magnific Land of Fire!Trip TO Azerbaijan – Magnific Land of Fire!

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Activities in Gazakh

Aveydagh (6th-7th centuries)

Aveydag is one of the peaks and a white-greyish ridge in the Small Caucasus Mo­untains located between Georgia and Gazakh District. It is 12 km away from the village of Dash Salahli. Entry is banned here as it is very close to the front line. There is an Albanian temple here. Chris­tian temples were usually built on top of previous pagan temples. The word Avey­dag allows us to assume that there was an Albanian lunar temple here. The pla­ce name is interpreted as a lunar house. In general, moon worshipping has been quite common among Turks since anci­ent times. Ancient Turks had the phrase Ay Tangri (Moon God). The historian G. Geybullayev explains that the word Avey should actually be pronounced as Ayev (Ayevdagh). V. Radlov recorded that Al­taic Turks had a myth called Ay Moko (Strong Moon).

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Blue sepulcher (1896)

It is the hearth of Haji Afandi. People from Ganja to Gazakh say “I swear by the blue sepulcher” when they take the oath. Locals say that Haji Mahmud Afan­di Garani’s sepulcher is a well-known shrine in the Caucasus and even in Tur­key. The sepulcher is located in the old graveyard of Aslanbayli on the left of the road stretching along the Inja River. It is behind a wide and strong fence. Two pe­ople have been buried in this blue and multi-pointed sepulcher. One of them is Seyid Yasin, a close associate and friend of Haji Mahmud Afandi. The sepulcher was built first in 1893 with Haji’s partici­pation. According to his will, Haji Afandi was buried here after his death. Nigari, one of his followers, moved to Turkey la­ter and died there. It is interesting that Haji Mahmud Afandi from Gazakh built a big mosque on the grave of his teacher Seyid Nigari in the Turkish city of Amas­ya. A plaque with the name of Haji Mah­mud Garani has been put up on the front side of the mosque. Haji Mahmud Afan­di who was originally from Aslanbayli returned home after completing his reli­gious education in Turkey 150 years ago. He was known for his hard work and kindness. The Aslanbayli village mosque was built on the highest hill of the village

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Kamarli village

The village, which is situated on the edge of the Inja Gorge on the border, is surrounded by vegetation. There is an artificial lake here. The handover of the village’s Khanbaghi historical forest to Armenians caused a scandal in 1984. Although several high-ranking officials were dismissed, the lands never came back. Khanbaghi used to be a summer holiday destination belonging to aris­tocratic families.

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Inja Gorge

One of the tourist routes goes along this gorge. Inja is the name of a river. It is a place that has beautiful views and orchards. Its plains which start from the foot of the Gazakh mountains are co­vered with alpine grasslands. This is the Altuntakht summer pasture. The Inja Gorge is situated behind the pasture. Mount Garagoyunlu is situated in front of the gorge. The Inja Gorge is rich in historical monuments and includes four villages: Aslanbayli, Gaymagli, Kamarli and Khanbagi.

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Didevan tower (6th-7th centuries)

It is a watchtower. It is also called Dada­ban – the father’s house. Until the middle of 20th century, the tower was a shrine. The watchtower was built in the first mil­lennium BC and was part of a defensive system together with the Albanian temp­le on Mount Avey. This monument of defensive nature on the territory of the village of Khanliglar is on the list of arc­hitectural monuments of national impor­tance. Although it has different names and is interpreted differently, its interp­retation as Dadaban – the father’s hou­se – seems more convincing. Dadaban Tower is shaped like a truncated cone. It is 9-10 metres in height and 5-6 metres in diameter. The colour of the tower is black grey. When you look at it from afar, it looks like an Ottoman fez hat. It is also known as the “Koroghlu barrel”. This name was given to the tower because it resembles a barrel. It is located on top of Mount Didevan on an ancient caravan route from Iravan to Gazakh. It was built from large pieces of rock. The Gol restaurant in a lush area near the village of Damirchilar-Khanliglar on the Armenian border has been famous sin­ce Soviet times. Some parts of the tower, located on the Iravan-Gazakh caravan route, were destroyed as a road was bu­ilt to the abovementioned restaurant in the 1970s. There is a reason why the Di­devan Tower, which belongs to the 6th- 7th centuries, is known as the Koroghlu tower among people. It is believed that Koroghlu passed through this area du­ring one of his journeys.

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Avey Albanian temple (5th-6th centuries)

It is only one hour and 15 minutes’ walk. It is located on the southern peak of Mo­unt Avey at a height of 920 metres. There is an old and narrow path leading here from the west. There is a wonderful view of the surroundings from the peak. The two-cell temple was built from Avey’s own stone. Archaeologists believe that throughout history, the Avey Temple has been properly restored three times, last time in 1838. When another building standing underneath the current one was studied, it became known that this building was built during the time of Ca­ucasian Albania roughly in the 5th-6th centuries. A number of local and Geor­gian scientists believe that in the pre- Christian period, in the 4th century, it was a lunar temple. There are many mo­numents on Mount Avey and near Avey and Goyazan. For this reason, the Avey historical-cultural reserve was set up here in 1989. The sites of eight temples, two settlements, an ancient Albanian- Oghuz graveyard, a defensive fence, the sites of two fortifications and about 30 artificial caves have been discovered in the southeast and west of Mount Avey. Damjili is also one of the main sites in the reserve.

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Aveydagh (6th-7th centuries)

Aveydag is one of the peaks and a white-greyish ridge in the Small Caucasus Mo­untains located between Georgia and Gazakh District. It is 12 km away from the village of Dash Salahli. Entry is banned here as it is very close to the front line. There is an Albanian temple here. Chris­tian temples were usually built on top of previous pagan temples. The word Avey­dag allows us to assume that there was an Albanian lunar temple here. The pla­ce name is interpreted as a lunar house. In general, moon worshipping has been quite common among Turks since anci­ent times. Ancient Turks had the phrase Ay Tangri (Moon God). The historian G. Geybullayev explains that the word Avey should actually be pronounced as Ayev (Ayevdagh). V. Radlov recorded that Al­taic Turks had a myth called Ay Moko (Strong Moon).

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Sinig Bridge (5th century)

It is believed that this bridge, which is in­tended for carts, phaetons, camels and mules, was built either under the Sas­sanids (3rd century) or during the time of Caucasian Albania (5th century). The stone crown of the bridge broke many years later. Since then, it has been called the Sinig Bridge (Broken Bridge). Some parts of the bridge which broke in the course of time are still intact. A forester’s house has been built on the remains of its foundation on the left bank, and it works as a canteen. As there is another bridge standing nearby, together they are called Gosha Bridge (Double Bridge).

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Shikhli human camp

1,023 archaeological items were found during excavations near the first village of Shikhli. The settlements of Uzundara, Chingildara and Ajitapa were discovered here. The villages of Shikhli 1 and Shikh­li 2 are situated on the Georgian border, and they are the homeland of Ismayil Shikhli, the Shikhlinski generation of pro­minent generals, one of legendary World War II guerrillas and Italy’s national hero Serafino and the classic of Azerbaijan’s ashig literature, Molla Vali Vidadi

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Damjili

Samad Vurgun called this place the world’s eighth and Azerbaijan’s first wan­der. He would not let his guests go wit­hout treating them to Damjili water and kebab and to Dash Salahli khingal. With the onset of summer, all residents of Ga­zakh come here on holiday. It is the main holiday and picnic site in the district. This place is definitely shown to guests. A carpet from plants has been woven on the rock. Water dripping from it is drin­kable. When you look up, you cannot see the peak. Clean and pure cold wa­ter is dripping from between these huge 1,000 metre high rocks and becomes a spring by collecting down below. Damjili used to be a shrine. Stone from Mount Avey was cut and used. The particularity of these rocks is that they keep the water cool and filter it

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